Alternative download Fortnite iPhone post deletion, now it is no longer available in the App Store

The battle that Epic Games has unleashed against Apple and Google has caused, among many other things, that Fortnite has disappeared from the App Store and Google Play and can no longer be downloaded.

On Android, the problem is easy to solve and the alternative to Google Play is still legal, as they have only taken a step back and are offering it in the same way as before. However, with Apple things change quite a bit.

Alternative download Fortnite iPhone post deletion

Because Apple only allows apps to be downloaded from its store, downloading Fortnite on iOS is completely impossible unless you've downloaded it before. That's right, even if you can download it you won't be able to enjoy new updates unless the Cupertino company of your arm to twist.

The only thing you need to keep in mind to be able to download Fortnite on iPhone after being removed from the App Store is that you have had it in the past and you have deleted it. If you are among the lucky ones, follow these simple steps:

- Open the App Store and tap Account, which is represented by a bluish avatar in the upper right corner.
Now give it to bought and then to my purchases.
- Finally, Type Fortnite in the browser and give the cloud icon to download to your device.


Once you've done this, you'll know how to download Fortnite on iPhone if you've deleted it. The bad thing is that even if you can play without problems, you will not be able to enjoy the new updates.

End of Alternative download Fortnite iPhone post deletion


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The real challenge of RadarCOVID, the contact tracking app, is to set it up: less tech savvy users will have trouble getting it to work

Spain is already releasing its app to track contacts in several autonomous communities.

Although one of its biggest challenges was initially expected to be that as many people as possible download it, I have realized that RadarCOVID has to overcome another big problem: that everyone is able to configure it and that it works properly.

The technology on which this application is based is developed by Google and Apple, and in appearance it is quite simple.

With the app installed and turned on, mobile phones are able to transmit codes to each other through a low-power Bluetooth system. The idea is for each mobile to make a history of the terminals it has detected nearby. That way, you'll have in your pocket an anonymized list of all the people you've run into on the street for two weeks.

If a person you have encountered during this time period communicates on the platform that has tested positive for COVID-19, you will receive a notification alerting you that you have been exposed to a potential contagion. The app will only alert you if the infected person was with you for more than 15 minutes less than a meter and a half away.

Spain is already releasing its app to track contacts in several autonomous communities.

Although one of its biggest challenges was initially expected to be that as many people as possible download it, I have realized that RadarCOVID has to overcome another big problem: that everyone is able to configure it and that it works properly.

The technology on which this application is based is developed by Google and Apple, and in appearance it is quite simple.

With the app installed and turned on, mobile phones are able to transmit codes to each other through a low-power Bluetooth system. The idea is for each mobile to make a history of the terminals it has detected nearby. That way, you'll have in your pocket an anonymized list of all the people you've run into on the street for two weeks.

If a person you have encountered during this time period communicates on the platform that has tested positive for COVID-19, you will receive a notification alerting you that you have been exposed to a potential contagion. The app will only alert you if the infected person was with you for more than 15 minutes less than a meter and a half away.

Apparently there was no problem. The app, every time it opened, indicated to me that notifications of possible exposure to COVID-19 had been updated with the date of the day it was.

However, every time I opened the app, this notification would appear on my device.

COVID-19 exposure notification technology is a development that Apple and Google announced in April this year and presented last May. It only appears in the latest versions of iOS (iPhone) and Android. This explains why only the latest versions of these operating systems support this app.

RadarCOVID, the government app that has been developed by Indra for more than 330,000 euros, operates using the technology of these two technology companies.

After going around the settings menus on my phone a lot, I realized what was happening. The system was restricting the application in the background, although apparently the idea of Apple and Google was to avoid this.

I had to go in my Xiaomi to the settings menu, then click on battery and performance, then select energy saving in applications and search for RadarCOVID. There, I had to select that the government app was "unrestricted": "the battery saver does not restrict app activity."

The problem is that I had to warn it myself, as the notification was too ambiguous.

I was confusing the problem with MIUI's battery optimizer, the Xiaomi layer on Android.

But it wasn't the only mistake.

In this case, the notification warned that there was an "error loading new infection data". At the time I write these lines is Friday 21 August and the application indicated that I had not registered new contacts. The Contacts update was from the day immediately before.

A colleague told me that he had experienced the same problem. He fixed it by disabling and re-activating COVID-19 exposure notifications, which you can find in the settings menu, on the Google tab.

I did the same thing, but I still had the problem. What I did was reboot my phone. It was working again.

I shared my experience in networks, and friends and colleagues have told me that they have suffered similar problems. For example, two people have reported that their phones stopped registering contacts several days ago, and they have everything configured perfectly.

An iOS user, for example, saw how her mobile had stopped updating the contact list on August 12. This screenshot was taken on the 21st.

Contact tracking apps only support the Google and Apple API when the user has authorized it on their phone, using the steps described above. But also, you have to keep enabled at all times the Bluetooth and also the geolocation of the device.

Even with those, users who regret how their terminals have been without registering contacts for several days assure that they have everything set up correctly. They will need to send an email to the app's technical support.

A third person in the last few hours has also moved me their problems with both battery saving. It has another Xiaomi device, a Mi Note 10 Lite. It also received notification of the transmission failure.

This person is not very shower on technology and was surprised all the steps he had to take to be able to solve this problem of the app.

Beyond the specific errors of transmission, which can be expected of a technology in development, my experience during the first few hours using the app in an autonomous community that is already notifying its positive platform is the real challenge of the app is not as expected.

Not that it is not downloaded enough people —a recent article in the MIT magazine clarified that it was not necessary for 60% of the population of a country to download the app for it to be effective—. The real challenge is for people less tech savvy to be able to know if the app is working properly.

The first error messages I received from the platform were the notifications in this article. Both are too ambiguous for a person who does not know in depth their operating system to be able to fix it on their own.

Some experts point out that transmission errors may have been one-off platform failures. In fact, radarcovid technicians are working piecemeal to solve all these problems, and it is expected that these errors will appear as the application is being tested to precisely debug as many errors as may exist.

The problem here is ambiguity. Failed notifications are not specific, and although the phone alerts you with these notifications that there is a problem with the app, it is very easy to dismiss the notification and ignore the problem.

The app, by itself, does not indicate in its interface that there is such a problem, so the user can interpret that in reality everything works correctly.

The contact tracking app is not the ultimate tool to stop the spread of coronavirus, but it can be a very valuable help in preventing new outbreaks. At the same time, it can be an effective tool for many people to feel safe by seeing that they have not been exposed to any contagion.

If the platform does not improve these design problems, that will actually be a false sense of security.

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