Netflix networks dilemma 11 controlling mobile addiction tips: Experts have long been arguing about how we have become addicted to social media, and noting that compulsive mobile use has been especially increased in recent years.

A new Netflix documentary paints an alarming picture of the extent of that addiction and how social networks have capitalized on it, catapulting tech companies as new global powers in the process. The networks dilemma explores different aspects and effects of the online world, including the lucrative economy of attention, addictive recommendation algorithms, misinformation, political polarization and more.

The documentary includes the participation of the ex-ethicist for the design of Google and president of the Center for Human Technology Tristan Harris, from the computer scientist Jaron Lanier, author Shoshana Zuboff, the former director of monetization for Facebook's Tim Kendall, of the scientific data and author Cathy O'neil, co-founder of Asana, as well as the former director of engineering of Facebook Justin Rosenstein, the first investor of Facebook Roger McNamee and many others.

You may want to throw your phone to the other end of the room at the end of the hour-and-a-half docudrama. But don't worry! The last 5 minutes are actually somewhat hopeful, as industry experts share a series of tips to limit the use of mobile and the addictive technology that lives on it.

Netflix networks dilemma 11 controlling mobile addiction tips

Read on to discover the collection of tips provided by this new Netflix documentary:

- Don't click on recommended videos or posts

Recommendation algorithms have become a kind of secret ingredient for technology platforms. They are the ones that keep users interested in the apps, queuing related content for when they finish reading a post or watching a video. For example, the recommendation algorithm for TikTok, the video sharing app that has gained so much popularity and is currently embroiled in a confrontation with the Trump administration, is the jewel of the service that has captivated millions of young users.

Author and computer scientist Jaron Lanier, known as the founding father of virtual reality, commented that instead of letting algorithms guide us, it's better to search for the content we want to see ourselves.

"Always choose. That's another way to fight, " he says in the documentary.

- Former YouTube developer Guillaume Chaslot advises installing a Chrome extension that can undo recommendations on platforms

There are a lot of extensions available, such as one that blocks videos and comments recommended on YouTube.

The interviewer of the documentary comments that Chaslot is trying to undo something he helped create: Chaslot was co-creator of YouTube's recommendation algorithm before leaving Google in 2013.

- Turn off notifications on apps that aren't sending you important or timely information

This is a good way to set boundaries with social networks, as indicated by participants in the documentary, including Harris, former Facebook operations manager Sandy Parakilas, former head of user experience at Mozilla Aza Raskin and Rosenstein.

- Uninstall apps you don't use or think are wasting your time

Rosenstein said he does so with social media and news apps.

- Don't use Google: use an alternative search engine

Chaslot said it uses Qwant as it "does not store its search history".

- Before sharing a fragment of content online, " verify the facts and consider the source"

Renee DiResta, director of research at Stanford's Internet Observatory, said that if you get the feeling that some publication just tries to "appeal to your emotions, it probably is."

This advice may have even more weight before the upcoming 2020 presidential election in the United States, as technology companies struggle to control erroneous information on their platforms.

- Don't click on clickbait content

When you click on "clickbait," or stories with incendiary headlines that poorly advertise the true content of the article, you are feeding a faulty system, according to Rosenstein. News publishers have been forced to adapt to the algorithms of these technology platforms, changing the type of stories they publish based on what attracts more visitors.

- Data scientist and author Cathy O'neil advises following people on social media that you disagree with

Some experts say that social networks have exacerbated political polarization, another adverse side effect caused by technology platforms, according to the documentary.

Another school of thought is that, while networks may indeed be polarizing, it is not entirely their fault: political opinion was already in this situation, as Casey Newton of The Verge reported.

Contrary to O'neil's advice, a 2018 study provided evidence that following those with opposing views can actually increase polarization, although the study had several limitations.

- Don't let your kids use social media

Several of the technologists featured in the documentary stood firm against this rule. Alex Roetter, former senior vice president of Engineering at Twitter, said his children do not use social networks at all. "It's a rule," he said. Former Facebook monetization director Tim Kendall also said he is adamant about it:" we don't allow our children to spend time in front of the screen, " he sentenced.

Jonathan Haidt, a social psychologist and author at New York University, said that if he eventually allows his children to register on social networks, he will wait until they are in high school.

Teenage phone addiction is depicted in a surprising scene during the dramatized part of the networks dilemma. In one scene, a girl visibly yearns for her phone after her mother locks each family member's device and stores them in a glass box during dinner. The daughter sneaks off the table and hits the case with a wrench, opening it to get it back to her mother's horror.

- Leave the mobile phone out of the room from a specific time

Several of the technologists featured in the documentary stood firm against this rule. Alex Roetter, former senior vice president of Engineering at Twitter, said his children do not use social networks at all. "It's a rule," he said. Former Facebook monetization director Tim Kendall also said he is adamant about it:" we don't allow our children to spend time in front of the screen, " he sentenced.

Jonathan Haidt, a social psychologist and author at New York University, said that if he eventually allows his children to register on social networks, he will wait until they are in high school.

Teenage phone addiction is depicted in a surprising scene during the dramatized part of the networks dilemma. In one scene, a girl visibly yearns for her phone after her mother locks each family member's device and stores them in a glass box during dinner. The daughter sneaks off the table and hits the case with a wrench, opening it to get it back to her mother's horror.

- Leave the mobile phone out of the room from a specific time

He acknowledged that it was unrealistic to expect everyone to do so, but warned that even some people who delete their accounts and break free from "manipulation engines" could help initiate a social dialogue on the issue.

These are simply tips to reduce phone use and the addictive technology and social networking apps it contains, but a lot of factors will have to work together before we see any real change, such as massive public pressure and a desire by tech companies themselves to reform, according to technologists and experts on the networks dilemma.

The docudrama is available on Netflix.

Netflix networks dilemma 11 controlling mobile addiction tips

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